The Detroit Tigers could be headed to old, (un)familiar territory

Written by :
Published on : November 11, 2016

 

 

2003 was a long time ago. George W. Bush was in his first term as President. Facebook wasn’t even a thing yet. The iPhone hadn’t even been thought of. And the Detroit Tigers were awful. Among the most awful baseball teams in the modern history of the game to be more specific. Their 119 losses in that year was 1 loss short of the 1962 Mets record for losses in a season. When the Tigers won that last game to avoid tying that record you would have thought that they had won a World Series. Players and fans rejoiced that they weren’t the worst. But they were damn close.

 

Three years after that historically disastrous season, the Detroit Tigers had won the American League Pennant, after making the playoffs as the Wild Card team, and went on the the World Series. It was an amazingly quick turnaround that marked the beginning of a new golden era in Detroit baseball. The organization led by Dave Dombrowski, for most of the period since 2003, would go on to appear in another World Series in 2012, and win the AL Central four times.

 

 

Under Dombrowski (now with with Boston Red Sox) and long-time manager Jim Leyland (retired), the Tigers and the city of Detroit enjoyed a decade of relatively good, competitive baseball. They got to see triple crown winner Miguel Cabrera destroy the baseball and Cy Young contenders such as Justin Verlander, Max Scherzer and David Price destroy opposing batters. Acquiring and retaining such marquee talent isn’t easy though, and because of it the organization consistently found itself with one of the larger payrolls in the MLB, and a depleted farm system. And that leaves the Detroit Tigers and their fans here, on the edge of some potentially dark days.

 

Shortly after the end of the 2016 MLB season, Tigers president, Al Avila, made it clear that the team would be retaining manager Brad Ausmus and cutting payroll in a big way. Neither of these things should sound like good news to Tigers’ fans. Brad Ausmus hasn’t necessarily been terrible as the manager in Detroit but he has failed to win a playoff game despite having a considerable amount of talent on the roster. The team isn’t doomed with him at the helm, but he probably isn’t the person to take them to the next level either. More of the same.

 

What should really make fans shudder, is that this team seems determined to slash payroll. The most likely victims of the cost cutting mandate in the front office will be Justin Verlander, JD Martinez and Miguel Cabrera. Years of squeezing their farm system to acquire big name players and breaking the bank to keep those players left the Tigers with a payroll of $199 million last season. That was behind only the Dodgers, Yankees and Red Sox. All teams that made the playoffs. When you don’t make the playoffs two years running and you are spending that kind of money, it’s easy to see why ownership would want to re-examine their methods. That could mean saying goodbye to the players who have defined baseball in Detroit for years.

 

 

The team says they are listening to offers for any and all players. If that’s really the case then there’s a good chance that Verlander is leaving soon. He is 34 and coming off of his best season since 2012. His value is high and he could net a good return in an offseason with a poor market for starting pitching. Trading him will help the team shed $28 million in salary this coming year. With a big enough return, I’m sure the fan reaction to the trade could be mostly positive. I’m not sure the same goes for a trade involving Miggy. His contract runs through 2023 and he is owed no less than $28 million in any of those coming seasons. For an aging slugger, that’s a lot for a potential trade partner to deal with. The team would probably be lucky to unload him at this point, but he is such a fan favorite that I don’t know that they could get enough in return to fill the void left in the hearts of fans.

 

Will the fans really be able to withstand a prolonged playoff drought plus watching their favorite players leave town? That could be hard to stomach in Detroit and could leave Comerica Park looking a lot more empty than it has been for a long time. It’s hard to be too optimistic about the Detroit Tigers in the near future. Rebuilding is never an easy thing. Fans who have joined the team in only the recent good years, might have to suffer through a bit of losing. Something that isn’t the norm. For those that have been in with the team for decades, we might be returning to the dark ages of the 90’s. Nobody wants that but sometimes it has to get worse before it gets better.

 

 


Angelino in the Outfield (Episode XV: Ichiro and the hit record)

Written by :
Published on : June 17, 2016

 

This week, Ichiro Suzuki of the Miami Marlins got his 4,257th career hit, passing Pete Rose for the all-time lead… if you combine his MLB hits with the 1,278 he got in Japan. So the manufactured debate this week was whether or not Ichiro was the true hit king. You might be thinking, “Who would even make that argument?” But trust me, I’ve had it. Nerds find each other.

 

My short answer is, I love Ichiro. But Pete Rose is still the hit king. He got all 4,256 hits in the Majors and we don’t even have to bring the 427 hits he got in the minors in to the equation. What you do in the Majors should be the only thing that matters. Granted, what Ichiro has done in the Majors is also remarkable. I think he’s a first-ballot Hall of Famer (something Pete Rose definitely can’t say) without any of his Japanese stats. I could give you a long list of all of his accomplishments in baseball since 2001, but it’s not like he’s dying, so we can probably save those for another day. Just know Ichiro is an all-time great and I’m taking nothing away from him. Besides, you know, about 1,300 Japanese hits.

 

My longer answer would include an analysis of the Nippon Professional Baseball Organization, where the final answer always ends up being, “Dude. Matt Murton was awesome there. It’s not as good as the Majors.” But I’ll go a little further. Ichiro broke into the NBP when he was 18. And he was a 4th-round pick in Japan because he only weighed 124 pounds. 124 POUNDS!!!  Nomar Mazara is the youngest position player in the Majors right now. And he’s three years older, with 90 pounds on young Ichi. No MLB team would bring up (or even draft) an 18-year-old outfielder with a weird swing who weighed 124 pounds. Hardly any teams bring up teenagers now. Julio Urias is the first teenager to play in the bigs since 2012. So I think we can rest assured that Ichiro (although very good) would not have come to the Majors in 1992, 1993 or 1994 as the first Japanese position player in MLB history and been plugged in right away. Scouts weren’t even sure about him after he’d gotten seven consecutive batting titles in Japan. So the answer is still no.

 

 

The fun part, for me is when you do go down that slippery slope of including every other professional league to see what kind of hit totals some other players would have gotten. Ichiro might actually be the 6th, 7th or 10th professional player to reach 4,000 hits. Nobody is really sure. Besides Rose and Ty Cobb, there’s also a guy named Arnold John “Jigger” Statz (whose name’s ironic value is not lost on me) who played 18 seasons in the minors between 1920 and 1942. There’s Minnie Minoso (of Bill Veeck publicity stunt fame), who also played in the Cuban, Mexican and Negro Leagues. Julio Franco (yes, THAT Julio Franco) played in the US, Japan, South Korea and Mexico. He’d be at around 4,000 too. Then you could add in the minor league stats of Stan Musial, as well as the Cuban League, Puerto Rican Winter League and all the exhibition stats for Cobb and Hank Aaron. And then the lost minor league stats for Jake Beckley and Sam Crawford, which would also bring them in around 4,000. It’s basically a disaster.

 

Ichiro was a great player who happened to play in a AAAA league for 9 years. Yes, their schedule is 32 games shorter than the Majors. Yes, Ichiro has been facing flame-throwing relief specialists that Rose never had to face. But Pete Rose did it all in the Majors. And, if anything, all this Ichiro talk has to make you appreciate what Rose did over 24 seasons even more than you already did. Forget the gambling and the lying for just one second. And just think about 4,256. It’s amazing. Then think about how Shoeless Joe Jackson was on the Hall of Fame ballot in 1936. Think about what an absolute piece of trash Ty Cobb was. And consider that, while we’re all congratulating Ichiro on his accomplishment, if it might be time to finally honor somebody else as well. And no, I’m not talking about Jigger Statz.

 

Okay. Let’s go around the league.

 

AL East

 

The East Cost media bias is hilarious to me. Because instead of talking about how the Orioles keep sticking around and mashing home runs, or how the Blue Jays keep gaining ground, or even how Evan Longoria and the Rays got red-hot this week, they’re mostly picking their favorite Red Sock of the week (Steven Wright) and deciding on which reliever the Yankees have to give up if, and when, they become sellers.

 

Sure, both of those things are probably important in the long run. Wright (a knuckleballer) didn’t even know if he was going to be a starter at the beginning of the season. Now he’s the best pitcher in the division. And that’s got to be a pleasant surprise for a team that’s paying $30 million to David Price. I’m just saying that since they can’t really call the Red Sox the best team in the league any more, they’ll figure out a way to talk about whatever bright spot they can. And Wright fills that position for the time being. Next week, we’ll probably be back to Xander Bogaerts, David Price and Jackie Bradley Jr.

 

As far as the Yankees go, there are plenty of teams in contention who would love a bat like Carlos Beltran’s or the bullpen help of Andrew Miller or Aroldis Chapman. But, until the trade deadline, maybe I have to be the voice of reason here to say that Yankees are done and the Red Sox are are a slump or two away from being in third place.

 

AL Central

 

Does anybody want this thing? I’m not so sure. After a great month from the Indians, the streaky Royals decided they wanted to win again. Maybe they were feeling lucky after Yordano Ventura’s bullshit suspension. Maybe the whole division is mediocre. I don’t know. But I guess one interesting thing came out of the Central this week…

 

The White Sox designated Jimmy Rollins for assignment and I heard a few people discussing whether or not J-Roll is a Hall of Famer. The answer is a solid no, but it’s always fun to argue. And in case you were wondering, his career stats just aren’t there (231 HR, .264 AVG, 2,455 H), he’s not as good as Alan Trammell, who isn’t in the Hall of Fame, and he’s essentially a middle-of-the-pack shortstop with a handful of good seasons. That does include an MVP award and a ring. But he was the second-best player on his own team in both of those years. The guy has had a great career. He also had a 38-game hitting streak from 2005-2006. He was on a great Phillies team, and is the all-time leader in hits for the franchise. And he’s in the MC Hammer “Adams Groove” music video. That’s got to be worth something. He’s just not worthy of Cooperstown.

 

AL West

The Rangers are the best team in the American League. That’s become pretty clear. And that’s with Yu Darvish and Adrian Beltre fighting injuries. When you’re hot, you’re hot. And the Rangers are off to the best start in their franchise history.

 

NL East

 

The Nationals are also scorching hot. And everyone decided that their series with the Cubs, where they took 2-out-of-3, had a playoff feel to it. Even though Jake Arrieta and Jon Lester (with their sub-2 ERAs) didn’t pitch. And even though, when the Cubs destroyed them earlier in the season, nobody seemed to think it mattered. Daniel Murphy might end up being better than Bryce Harper this season. Stephen Strasburg is being hailed as the new Walter Johnson. Max Scherzer struck out 9 of the first 10 Cubs he faced on Monday. And they should just hope that Dusty Baker sending them out there to throw over 100 pitches an outing doesn’t come back and bite them. The Mets, with all their injuries and general lack of hitting, probably should though.

 

NL Central 

There hasn’t been a lot of good news for the Pirates lately, other than the emergence of Jameson Taillon, who was drafted between Bryce Harper and Manny Machado in 2010. That’s a first round that also included Matt Harvey (7), Chris Sale (13) and Noah Syndergaard (38), by the way. So like, WOW. With Gerrit Cole out, the Pirates might need to call up Tyler Glasnow and hope Taillon can keep up his hot start. Because the only way they can really avoid another Wild Card this year is by not making the playoffs.

 

The team that replaced Pittsburgh for the second Wild Card spot was the Cardinals, who are finally almost playing like the St. Louis Cardinals are supposed to play. I mean, they’re still 9.5 back of the Cubs. And the Dodgers will probably pass them eventually, but I’m letting them have their moment. Even though complimenting anything about them makes me feel so gross that I might need to take a shower.

 

As for the Cubs, they still have the best record in baseball. But the bullpen seems to be a glaring weakness that is feeding the rumor mill that they’d be willing to give up one of their young stars to the Yankees for Miller or Chapman. I just hope that young star is not Kyle Schwarber. Thankfully, Albert Almora came up recently and reminded everybody just how many young position players these Cubs can afford to give up to make a run at October.

 

Speaking of trades, also keep your eye on the Brewers, who could unload Ryan Braun and/or Jonathan Lucroy. Besides the Yankees’ Nasty Boys (or No-Run-DMC for Dellin, Miller and Chapman), the Brewers are the most talked-about trade deadline team in the Majors.

 

NL West

 

If there’s any pitcher in the National League who everyone should be talking about, it’s Clayton Kershaw. And yet all of the noise is being made about Madison Bumgarner. Just so we’re clear, MadBum has only had one 5+ WAR season in his career and Kershaw has a 4.8 RIGHT NOW. In mid-June. And isn’t Johnny Cueto having a better season on the mound than Bumgarner, anyway? I guess I’ve just never experienced anything quite like a guy hitting two homers and everyone acting like that makes him the greatest pitcher in the world.

 

Well, that’s gonna do it for this week in the outfield. Next week, I’ll be off in Iowa, where there are no outfields. If you need more, check me out on the MLB Recaps on “Comedians Talking Sports” with Joe Kilgallon. Til next time, Ichiro needs 21 hits and the Cubs’ Magic Number is 89.

 

 


Angelino in the Outfield (Episode II)

Written by :
Published on : March 8, 2016

 

 

Yoenis Cespedes is almost single-handedly making me want to root for the Washington Nationals in the NL East this year. After the Mets gave Cespedes a $27.5 million salary ($22.5 million more than the hated-but-much-better Bryce Harper makes in Washington), he’s turned their Spring Training camp into a a daily episode of MTV Cribs, with multiple custom cars, two tricked-out Polaris Slingshots and a fire-breathing Lamborghini Aventador. All custom-designed by some guy in Miami who is probably not a total douchebag of the worst kind or anything. Now Cespedes is buying $7,000 grand champion hogs at county fairs, slaughtering them and riding horses to work. We get it, you’re MC Hammer.

 

The thing is, for all the love that Cespedes, the Mets and their pitching staff is getting right now, it was the Nationals who were in their same position this time last season. Now the Nats have Anthony Rendon, Jayson Werth and Ryan Zimmerman back for full seasons. And while Max Scherzer and a healthy Stephen Strasburg may not be deGrom-Harvey-Syndergaard, they’re still pretty fucking formidable. Especially since Scherzer is the best pitcher in the National League not named Clayton Kershaw. And despite all the fanfare, Steven Matz’ projections are pretty pedestrian, Bartolo Colon will be 43-years-old in May and Zack Wheeler’s stats don’t really inspire awe right now either.

 

Hate you.

 

There’s a bit of a drop-off in the rotation after the Mets’ Big Three. So I could see an argument why Gio Gonzalez, Tanner Roark and Joe Ross actually round out a better overall rotation than the pitching Murderer’s Row/Greatest Staff Ever in Queens. And I haven’t even talked about Lucas Giolito yet. Call me crazy, but with identical Vegas odds (89.5 wins) and my growing hatred of the 22nd-best hitter in baseball (Cespedes), I am thinking the Nats’ luck can’t be nearly as bad as it was last year. Now somebody just needs to call Dusty Baker and remind not to do to Strasburg what he did to Mark Prior back in Chicago.

 

Around the League

Last week, I named Carlos Correa as my pick for AL MVP. This week, I’ve also made up my mind on my AL Cy Young choice and it’s Chris Sale of the Chicago White Sox. If you ask me, he should have won the award last year since he had the best FIP and second-highest WAR in the league. But as of now, he’s the best pitcher of the past 2-3 years who still hasn’t brought home the hardware. I think he’s due. And it’d be nice if his teammates scored some runs for him to help in his cause. I’m sure Sox teammate Jose Quintana feels the same way since it’s probably not fun for someone with a 3.18 FIP to go 9-10 on the year. That’s approaching 2015 Corey Kluber-level ridiculousness.

 

In the National Leauge, the Cy Young is always Clayton Kershaw’s to lose. I know that. You know that. Everybody knows that. But what do you want me to do – actually pick Clayton Kershaw? That’s no fun. That’s like picking Mike Trout to win AL MVP. It’s actually probably even easier than that. You gotta go bolder sometimes. And so I’m going to chose somebody else who’s never won it, and that’s Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants. His projections are among the league leaders (with Kershaw, Scherzer, Jake Arrieta, Strasburg and Jose Fernandez), but MadBum is also looking at a league-topping 17-18 wins for the Giants. And that’s how Arrieta and Dallas Keuchel put the award away last year. I’d love to think another very-good-but-never-won-it player, Jon Lester of the Cubs, could have been my choice. But I already got my miracle pitching season out of Arrieta last year, so I can’t be too greedy. Johnny Cueto and Jeff Samardzija may be bust risks in San Fran this year, but Bumgarner never is.

 

Death, taxes and MadBum.

 

Also, since the Red Sox-loving media has spent about as much time as it could the past two weeks gushing over David Price and Craig Kimbrel and then crying about Pablo Sandoval’s tummy, this week they seem to have moved on to gushing over Mookie Betts. Next week I assume they’ll move on to Xander Bogaerts. But for now, did you know that Mookie Betts is also the greatest bowler of all time? You didn’t? Well he is. I don’t know how that will help the Red Sox to not finish in last place for the third straight year, but anyway, Mookie Betts, Mookie Betts, Mookie Betts. If you’re a Yankees fun, your current Mookie Betts is Andrew Miller. He’s the reason you can rest assured that the same Aroldis Chapman you were super excited to have signed in the offseason is also the guy you can now be like, “30 game suspension? Pffffff. We have Andrew Miller!” My own personal Mookie Betts this week is Addison Russell of the Cubs. I love my Barry Larkin Starter Kit. And did you see the monster bomb he hit in Arizona in the second game? It went so far that it totally didn’t make me give a shit if he could bowl at all.

 

Alright. We’ve got four weeks to go before the season starts. And I need all of this to distract me from whatever insane shit happened in the 2016 Presidential race this week. I might even suggest Yoenis Cespedes as a third party write-in candidate. A Cuban-born New York billionaire who loves publicity? He’s like all the GOP candidates wrapped into one. Which gives John Kasich another reason to drop out since he doesn’t fit into this equation either. I’d actually be hard-pressed to think of many things inside the Yoenis Cespedes/John Kasich venn diagram. But that doesn’t mean I won’t try. Four more weeks of Spring Training, baby! And I’ll be heading to Arizona to see the Cubs in three. If you see a Polaris Slingshot in the parking lot, it’s totally mine.

 

 

Angelino in the Outfield (Episode 1)

 

 


How Many Cy Youngs Should Cy Young Have Won?

Written by :
Published on : August 23, 2015

 

 

In 1955, legendary pitcher, Cy Young, died at the age of 88. The following year, Major League Baseball honored Young by creating an award in his name, which was originally to be given out to the very best pitcher in all of baseball. Brooklyn’s Don Newcombe won the inaugural award (even though it totally should have gone to Herb Score of the Indians). To that point in history, Young was probably not the greatest pitcher of all-time. The fact that he wasn’t inducted into the first Hall of Fame class of 1936 is pretty indicative of that. But he did have the most career wins, career losses, complete games, innings pitched, etc, etc. So that got me thinking: Cy Young pitched from 1890-1911. If his own award had existed way back then, how many would The Man, Himself have won? Let’s take a look.

 

1890. Just to be clear, this was still old-timey baseball. 1890 was only the second season in history that four balls equaled a walk. And only the fourth season where batters weren’t allowed to call for a high pitch or a low pitch. Pitchers had to throw underhand with a stiff wrist and elbow until 1883. And they couldn’t even throw all the way overhand until 1884. Coincidentally, that was the same year the catcher’s chest protector was introduced. Times were a tad different, to say the least. On top of all of that pitchers pitched inside of a flat box from 50 feet away. Nevertheless, my winner for 1890 is Kid Nichols of the Boston Beaneaters. Like Cy Young, Nichols was also a rookie and a future Hall of Famer. He’d go on to become the youngest pitcher to win 300 games. And he also claimed that (even though he started 562 games in his career) he was never removed from a game for a relief pitcher.

 

Kid Nichols during the 1897 season

 

1891. I’d give the award to Kid Nichols again. But this was also the first season when catchers were allowed to wear large padded mitts. And one of Young’s catchers was said to put a steak inside his glove to better protect himself.

 

1892. Young had the best standard stats of anyone in baseball. He led the league in wins, ERA, WHIP and shutouts. But “Wild” Bill Hutchinson of the Chicago Colts had better advanced stats, so he wins. Still, his 36-36 record that year makes my brain hurt.

 

1893. Because of hard-throwing pitchers like Young, Amos Rusie and Jouett Meekin, Major League Baseball decided to move the pitcher’s box back to its current distance of 60 feet, six inches. Nobody knows for sure how hard those guys threw. But Young got the nickname ‘Cy’ in 1889, because the fences he threw against looked like a cyclone hit them. The odd thing was, Young was only recording 2-3 strikeouts per game during that period. He later said, “I aimed to make the batter hit the ball, and I threw as few pitches as possible. That’s why I was able to work every other day.” I’d give the Cy Young Award to Cy Young in 1893. I wish I could give it to ERA champion, Ted Breitenstein, because I like his last name. But it’s pretty impressive that Cy Young’s first Cy Young Award would have been in a transition year for every pitcher in the league.

 

The 1890 Cleveland Spiders. Cy Young pictured middle row, third from the left.

 

1894. I’d give this one to “The Hoosier Thunderbolt” Amos Rusie of the New York Giants. People have tried to estimate that Rusie threw in the mid to upper 90s. But he was also wild as shit. And he led the league in walks from 1890-94. Even so, in 1894, he won the pitching Triple Crown and had the best advanced stats of anyone in baseball. A sensation during his career in New York, and considered huge by 19th Century standards (at 6’1″, 200 lbs), Rusie was eventually elected into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

 

1895. Cy Young would have won his second Cy Young Award. It was the year he added a ‘slow ball’ to his repertoire. And it was also the year he started wearing a glove.

 

1896. Cy Young would have won his third Cy Young. He also led the majors with 3 saves.

 

1897. I’d give Kid Nichols his third Cy Young Award. But in 1897, Cy Young also pitched his first no-hitter. Young initially gave up a hit down the third base line in the game, but his third baseman sent a note to the press box saying he’d committed an error, so they reversed the call. Throughout his career, Young still considered the game a one-hitter.

 

1898. Cy Young would have won his fourth Cy Young.

 

1899. I’d give it to Noodles Hahn of the Cincinnati Reds. Although he wasn’t a power pitcher, Noodles led the league in strikeouts from 1899-1901. He’d go on to pitch the first no-hitter of the 20th Century. After retiring in 1906, Hahn continued to work out with the Reds on game days until he was almost 70. It’s been said that the Reds players of the 1940’s had no idea ol’ Noodles was a former big league player.

 

Cy Young poses for a portrait in 1899, when he was with St. Louis.

 

1900. Cy Young would have won his fifth Cy Young. It was also around this time that the pitchers mound was invented. Seriously.

 

1901. That was the first year of the American League, and Young moved to the Boston Americans, where he won the pitching Triple Crown. He would have won his 6th Cy Young. 1901 was the year he began as a pitching coach for Harvard, which the Boston media found hilarious, since Young only had a 6th grade education. This was also the first year that catchers (in both leagues) had to remain under the bat.

 

1902. I’d give it to Rube Waddell of the Philadelphia Athletics, who is one of the most unusual and unpredictable players in the history of baseball. He once left the mound in the middle of a game to go fishing. He’d sometimes chase after fire trucks during games. Opposing fans held up puppies and shiny objects to distract him. He wrestled alligators in the offseason and was once bitten by a lion. They called him ‘Sousepaw’ because he once spent his entire signing bonus on a drinking binge. He forgot how many wives he’d had. Nobody really wanted him on their team, and yet he was the premier power pitcher of his day. In exhibition games, he’d wave his players off the field and then strike out the side. He’s even the second guy in history to strike out the side on 9 pitches. And he probably had some sort of mental disorder or spectrum-y thing. All that being said, Waddell was elected into the Hall of Fame in 1946. He and Young would have a rivalry for many years.

 

Rube Waddell warming up before a game in 1905

 

1903. Rube Waddell would have won his second Cy Young Award. But Cy Young would go on to pass Pud Galvin as the all-time winningest pitcher in 1903. And he’d start in Game 1 of the first modern World Series, throwing the first pitch in World Series history.

 

1904. Rube Waddell would have won his third Cy Young. On May 2, Waddell one-hit Young’s Boston Americans and then taunted Young to face him in a game, so he could do it again. On May 5, they went head-to-head and Young pitched the first perfect game of the modern era. Waddell was the 27th and final batter. And as Waddell flied out, Young shouted at him, “How do you like that, you hayseed?” Young went on to pitch 25 1/3 innings without giving up a hit (still a record), as well as 45 consecutive scoreless innings. Still, somehow Waddell had better advanced stats. Also, Young’s perfecto was the first of the modern era because two pitchers in 1880 (when you still had to toss underhand and batters could call for pitches) threw perfect games. We know that in one of them, three outs were made when a fielder caught a foul ball on one bounce. Rules are rules (and that used to be the rule), but that’s fucking stupid.

 

1905. Cy Young would have won his 7th Cy Young. Roger Clemens currently has the most ever at 7.

 

1906. Cy Young would have won his 8th Cy Young. Roger Clemens can suck it.

 

1907. Rube Waddell would have won his fourth Cy Young.

 

Young when he was with the Red Sox in 1908.

 

1908. Cy Young pitched his third no-hitter and broke the all-time record for strikeouts. But I would give the award to spitballer, Ed Walsh of the Chicago White Sox. Walsh has the lowest ERA in Major League history (1.82) and in 1910, he had a 1.27 ERA with a losing record. Legend has it that when they built Comiskey Park in Chicago, the architect consulted with Walsh before creating the park’s dimensions. He was elected into the Hall of Fame in 1946.

 

1909. I’d give it to Chief Bender of the Philadelphia Athletics. Bender got his nickname because he was part Native American and was raised on a reservation in Minnesota. Throughout his career, Bender faced discrimination and racist taunts from the opposing dugout. The only thing was, Bender was awesome. Sometimes when he’d shut down a team, he’d yell, “Foreigners! Foreigners!” right back at them. Oh, and he also invented the slider. Bender was elected into the Hall of Fame in 1953. His brother also played Major League Baseball, but wasn’t as fortunate. He ended up getting suspended after stabbing his manager multiple times.

 

Chief Bender

 

1910. Cy Young won his 500th game, but his torch was finally passed. Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators would have won the Cy Young. And he’d go on to win 417 games, the second-most all-time. He also lost an amazing 65 games because his Senators failed to score a run. In 1936, Johnson was part of the inaugural class at the Baseball Hall of Fame, along with Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner and Christy Mathewson.

 

Young retired after the 1911 season with 511 career wins. To put that into perspective, that’s about what Randy Johnson and Pedro Martinez had combined. And it’s more than Felix Hernandez, Clayton Kershaw, Max Scherzer and Zack Greinke currently have combined. It’s a record that will never be broken. Young was also seen as the bridge between the early days of baseball and the modern era. He pitched against Cap Anson, who became a pro in 1871. And he also pitched against Eddie Collins, who played until 1930. And he absolutely deserves to have the award named after him.

 

The Answer: Cy Young should have won 8 Cy Young Awards.

 

 

 


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