Angelino in the Outfield (Episode XXVIII: Jose Fernandez, Vin Scully and the Emotional Week That Was )

Written by :
Published on : September 30, 2016

 

I cried twice this week watching baseball games. Big blubbering tears that I didn’t even try to choke down. Neither time had anything to do with the team I support or much to do with an outcome of an actual game. The first was the culmination of a 67-year career, a beloved grandfather figure saying a heartfelt goodbye to a city and a stadium that has never seen baseball without him. And the second was because of a grieving friend circling the bases in tears after hitting his only home run of the year (an upper deck shot) and then subsequently being consoled by a dugout full of equally-bereaving teammates – a fitting tribute to a young superstar taken too soon by a tragic accident.

 

On Sunday, we all found out about the boating accident death of Jose Fernandez. But the life of Jose Fernandez made the news even harder to accept. Yes, he was the ace of the Marlins’ staff, an elite pitcher in the league. And yes, at 24, his future was unquestionably bright. But it was the passion and the childlike enthusiasm he exuded while playing and his overall love of the game for which he’ll be remembered.

 


Have you seen the GIF of Fernandez snagging Troy Tulowitzki’s lined shot up the middle from 2013? It almost perfectly encapsulates guy’s combination of dominance in performance and personality. Tulo looks on dumbfoundedly before mouthing, “Did you catch that?” And Fernandez (at that point a rookie, all Cheshire grins and swag) replies, “Yes. Yes, I did.” Baseball has seen its fair share of stoic, scowling aces over the years. There was only one Jose.

 

The Marlins understandably cancelled Sunday’s game against the Braves. But the tragic news had reverberated around the league. And tributes sprang up everywhere in dugouts around the country. On Monday, the visiting Mets players greeted the Marlins on the field (all of whom were wearing black ‘Fernandez 16’ jerseys) with hugs and watery eyes before the game. Not too long after, Dee Gordon led off the bottom of the 1st.

 

Some of you may recall the on-court death of Loyola Marymount All-American, Hank Gathers, in 1990. When the team played in that year’s NCAA Tournament, his good friend and teammate, Bo Kimble, who was right-handed, would shoot his first free-throws left-handed in memory of Gathers. Perhaps channeling his best Kimble, Dee Gordon (who bats left-handed) took the first pitch from Bartolo Colon right handed (a la Fernandez) before switching helmets and moving over to the left side of the plate. His first swing resulted in an upper deck shot to right. To that point, Gordon had 8 home runs in his career. He hadn’t hit one since October 4th of last year. And he said he’s never hit a ball that far in his life, even in batting practice.

 

 

The moment Gordon touched home, he pounded his chest and pointed to the sky, overcome with emotion. By the time he reached the dugout and was greeted with a bear hug from hitting coach, Barry Bonds, I was RUINED. It’s a moment that will go down in Marlins’ lore forever. And it was easily the moment of the year for the 2016 season.

 

Earlier this season, when talking about retired baseball numbers, I tagged the Marlins for having two World Series titles and absolutely no history. Jose Fernandez has changed all that. As a Cuban defector, his story already resonated with the fan base in Miami. His last outing against the Nationals was arguably his career best (8 IP, 3 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 12 K) and his joy in life can serve as an inspiration to a city rich in Cuban-American culture and to a sport so often bogged down by old school thinking and unwritten rules. For one day we were all Marlins fans. And going forward, that means so much more than it ever did before.

 

The other time I cried was for Vin.

 

I was going to watch Sunday’s Dodgers-Rockies game anyway. It was Vin Scully’s final home game, in a career with the Dodgers that began in 1950. That’s a Bill Murray’s lifetime worth of games. The Dodgers were also looking to clinch the division. And so I knew the game would end in memorable fashion, regardless of the outcome. On top of all that, in lieu of the Fernandez news, I knew turning on the game would give me the audio comfort food I needed to hear.

 

Listening to the greatest announcer in history has been a taken-for-granted pleasure of my entire sports-watching life. And it’s been increasingly more appreciated and pleasurable since I moved to Los Angeles in 2007. That’s when I knew what we had. So watching Sunday’s home finale (the Corey Seager game-tying home run in the 9th, the walk-off division-clincher by Charlie Culberson in the 10th) was one last chance for me to soak it all in. I mean, of course the guy’s final game at home ended like that. Vin Scully’s entire career was surrounded by these types of moments. This guy called perfect games by Don Larsen and Sandy Koufax, the Kirk Gibson home run in the 1988 World Series, Game 6 of the ’86 World Series and almost everything else in between. You can’t just let him walk away with a snoozefest. And then he gave his public farewell to the stadium. And I LOST it.

 

 

Scully, who had been saluted by Dodger batters throughout the game, and who was now being saluted by the Dodgers as a team, played a rendition of “Wind Beneath My Wings” that he’d sung himself. And, holy shit, there was not a dry eye in my house. The team had just clinched the NL West title, mind you. And the team waited respectfully for the song to be over before they sprayed champagne. I mean, only the scummiest of dirtbag Dodger fans could call that corny. And hopefully they were already trying to beat traffic back to Scumville when that happened. The song was motherfucking beautiful. And so is Vin. I’m really gonna miss him.

 

Instead of doing a career retrospective or trying to put his impact on the game or the culture of Dodgers baseball into worlds, I’ll just give you this. Here’s my All-Vin Scully Dodgers Team, 1950-2016. I think it speaks to his tenure and legacy, loud and clear.

 

C    1997    Mike Piazza
Roy Campanella may be the greatest Dodgers catcher of all-time (and he has 3 MVP awards to show for it), but in ’97, Piazza had a 9.1 WAR, he led the league in OPS+, he hit a ball all the way out of Dodger Stadium and set multiple offensive records for a catcher. Pretty good for a 62nd round pick.

 

1B    1954    Gil Hodges
In 1954, Hodges set the Dodger record for home runs in a season (42), and was also excellent defensively. It’s part of the reason Hodges might have been the only Dodger to never get booed at Ebbets Field. He’s the greatest Dodger first baseman of all time. And, yes, I see you, Steve Garvey.

 

2B    1951    Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson is obviously an American icon and 1951 wasn’t even his best season with the Dodgers. But Vin didn’t start with Brooklyn until 1950, okay? Robinson was great in every aspect of the game in ’51 and his 9.0 WAR led the Majors. He also happens to be the greatest Dodger second baseman of all time.

 

 It was always you, Jackie.

 

3B    2004    Adrian Beltre
Shoutout to Ron Cey, but nobody is topping Beltre’s 9.7 WAR and Major-League-leading 48 bombs in his 2004 breakout season.

 

SS    2016    Corey Seager
Seriously. This kid is good. In all 67 years of Scully’s tenure, nobody at short had a 7.5 WAR like Seager has had in his rookie season. Not Pee Wee Reese. Not Maury Wills. Nobody.

 

LF    1985    Pedro Guerrero
For greatest moment, it would have to be Gibson in ’88. And for multiple seasons, it might actually go to Dusty Baker (1976-1983). But in 1985, Guerrero led the league in OBP, SLG, OPS, OPS+, WAR and wOBA. He finished 3rd in MVP voting, but he really should have won it.

 

CF    1953    Duke Snider
The greatest center fielder in Dodgers’ history had his greatest overall season in 1953, leading the league in SLG, OPS and WAR. He also finished 3rd in MVP voting. Like Guerrero, he also should have won it.

 

RF    2001    Shawn Green
He’d hit four home runs in a game the following year, but in 2001, Green set the single-season Dodger record with 49. You just might not remember it because some other dude hit 73. If you’re not the steroid-era type (and Green might not have actually done any), we could go with 2011 Matt Kemp. Or just whatever-year Andre Ethier. Just know that if I had to do a list like this for my Len Kasper Cubs, the right fielder would be 2009 Kosuke Fukudome, so stop complaining.

 

SP    1965 Sandy Koufax
It’s hard to pin down exactly which Sandy Koufax season to choose, but in 1965, he won the pitchers’ Triple Crown, was the unanimous Cy Young winner, threw a perfect game (his 4th no-hitter) and won the World Series. All while dealing with tremendous pain. And not pitching on Yom Kippur. I love saying that Clayton Kershaw is better than Koufax, but he’s certainly never done all those things. Well, maybe he’s pitched on Yom Kippur.

 

 Sandy being Sandy.

 

Honorable mention to 1963 Koufax, 1966 Koufax, 2011, 2012, 2014 and 2015 Clayton Kershaw. Probably 2016 too, if he didn’t get hurt. 1999 Kevin Brown could be in there. 1971 Don Sutton. Shoutout to Don Drysdale. Shoutout to Fernando Valenzuela. Shoutout to Orel Hershiser. Jesus, Vin has seen some pitching. Of all the Dodger greats, I think he only missed Dazzy Vance (1922-1932). And Dazzy’s famous old-timey fastball probably topped out at 84.

 

RP    2003    Eric Gagne
In 2003, Gagne had 55 saves in 55 chances. That was good enough to tie the single-season NL record. Not that I care about saves. He also got more than half of his outs with K’s, with 100 more (137) than hits allowed (37). It won him the National League Cy Young. Even though I hate when relievers win and it should have gone to Mark Prior of the Cubs instead, that’s still pretty impressive.

 

Let’s go around the league.

 

 

The American League

 

The Rangers, Indians and Red Sox all won their divisions this week. But the Indians suffered another potentially fatal blow with the groin injury of Corey Kluber. They’re already down Carlos Carrasco and Danny Salazar, not to mention Michael Brantley. And now their ace? You almost have to feel bad for them. There probably shouldn’t even be an almost in that last sentence.

 

 The Indians may be celebrating but they’re hurting big time right now.

 

Home field advantage in the American League is probably going to come down between the Rangers (94-65) and the Red Sox (92-66). And after the Red Sox won their 11th game in a row this week, how much do you think Fox and MLB were salivating over the possibilities of a Cubs-Red Sox World Series? Count me in for that one too.

 

The Wild Card is where stuff gets fun. The Blue Jays (89.9%, Magic Number: 3 ) look to be in great position. As long as nobody else gets hurt in their dumb brawls. Pffff, Canadians. The Orioles are next at 66.6% (the percentage of the Beast), and then the Tigers (35.4%) and Mariners (8.0%), with the Astros and Yankees assumed to be done. And with the Royals officially eliminated, that makes it four straight years that a team has won the World Series and then failed to make it in to the postseason the following year.

 

The best arguments this week are over the AL Rookie of the Year and whether or not Zach Britton should be the Cy Young. And you’re probably wondering if I have some opinions. To quote the late, great Jose Fernandez, Yes. Yes, I do.

 

First of all, Zach Britton should not be the AL Cy Young winner. I know his 0.55 ERA is amazing. But I don’t give a shit about saves and he’s only pitched 65.1 innings this season. If Clayton Kershaw isn’t eligible in the National League at 142 innings, then you just have to admit you worship the stupid save stat because you’ve been taught to worship Mariano Rivera. Ugh. Relievers are guys who aren’t good enough to start. They pitch one inning a game. We shouldn’t even be having this conversation.

 

 Sorry Zach, but it shouldn’t be you.

 

Kershaw’s WAR is 6.5. Britton’s is 2.4. Also, you can’t really prove to me that Britton (although he’s very good in his role) is better than Andrew Miller. Miller has a higher WAR (2.8), a lower FIP (1.74 to 1.99) and his 1.50 ERA is a full run higher than Britton’s, but it’s still a 1.50 ERA. There’s also a pretty decent-sized list of relievers over the years with a 2.4 WAR, 1.99 FIP and an ERA under 2. Nobody tried to award them with anything. The only reason you hear Britton’s name get brought up so much in the Cy conversation is because there’s no obvious leader amongst the starters and nobody wants to do any actual work (I do. I like it. And right now I’d actually give it to Rick Porcello).

 

Another reason I know that nobody wants to do any work is because absolutely nobody is putting Christopher Devenski of the Astros in to the AL Rookie of the Year conversation. If the arguments for Britton make him so awesome, then Devenski, as the third best reliever in the league after Miller and Britton (2.2 WAR, 2.13 FIP, 1.61 ERA), should be right up there with Gary Sanchez and Michael Fulmer. But he’s not. Sanchez has a 3.2 WAR. Fulmer has a 3.0 WAR. Devenski has a 2.9 WAR. I feel like people just pick a guy or a ‘story’ and then find stats to support their guy or their story, instead of doing the opposite. And that makes Baby grouchy.

 

 

The National League

 

I already told you that the Dodgers clinched this week, but so did the Nationals. And the Cubs secured home field advantage. And just like the Indians in the American League, the National League also has its fair share of injury-decimated teams heading in to October.

 

This week, the Nationals lost Wilson Ramos for the season with a torn ACL, which is a major loss. They also found out Stephen Strasburg will not be ready for the NLDS against the Dodgers. And any start he would potentially make after that would essentially be the playoff version of a rehab start, anyway. Bryce Harper, who was probably already playing hurt, also injured his thumb on a fake tag play by Jung Ho Kang of the Pirates. And Daniel Murphy has been out of the starting lineup with a strained left buttock. I should probably censor myself from posting any ironic glee that I feel about the last one. I mean, I could have just posted, “Nats’ injuries: Murphy’s butt and Harper’s thumb. You figure out how that sort of thing could happen.” But I would never do that.

 

 This is Jayson Werth but it’s probably how the whole Harper’s thumb, Murphy’s butt thing looked.

 

Then there are the Mets, who just found out that Steven Matz is also done for the season. They may have the best shot at clinching a Wild Card (98.6%, Magic Number: 2), but who can say for sure whether or not Noah Syndergaard will be in line for the Wild Card game. Or if they’ll have to go with Bartolo Colon or someone from their entirely made-up pitching staff. Or if they should just pick somebody out of the stands in Queens who looks like they might not have elbow problems, bone spurs or thoracic outlet syndrome.

 

Assuming the Mets limp in the Wild Card, that leaves the Giants (67.6%) and Cardinals (33.7%) to battle it out for the second slot. The Cardinals have a game left with the Reds and then three with the Pirates. And the Giants have one more with the Rockies and then three with the Dodgers, who you have to assume would love to play spoiler against their arch nemesis. As a baseball fan, I should be rooting for a three-way tie and embracing the chaos. As a Cubs fan, I don’t know how thrilled I am about the possibilities of a Cardinals NLDS upset.

 

Finally, I want to mention the sendoff David Ross got on Sunday night. It could have been the third thing I cried about this week. I thought it was a classy move all the way around, by Joe Maddon, by Jon Lester, by the Cubs’ fans and even by Yadier Molina of the Cardinals who got Grandpa Rossy his own little moment at the plate. And then Grandpa Rossy, himself, for hitting that home run. Just in case the game of baseball didn’t have enough Hollywood-worthy moments this week.

 

 So long old man.

 

Well, that’s it for this week. By the next time we talk, we’ll be in the playoffs. If you need more baseball from me, you can check out “Comedians Talking Sports” with Joe Kilgallon on iTunes or the podcast things. Go Cubs.

 

 


Angelino in the Outfield (Episode XVIII: The First Half in Review)

Written by :
Published on : July 16, 2016

 

 

Can you believe we made it all the way through the first half? We’ve already seen epic brawls, surprise teams, a 20-strikeout game, debilitating injuries, returns from debilitating injuries, historic starts, historic rookies and individual performances that range from career years to retiring veterans to perhaps the greatest pitcher we’ve ever seen in the prime of his career. And also, we saw a home run from big sloppy fatso, Bartolo Colon. So let’s look at the first half that was.

 

The AL East

 

Playoff Teams: Baltimore, Boston, Toronto.

 Big Papi looks to be headed for the playoffs in his final season.

 

The Orioles are the surprise team of the first half, and I dismissed them outright until they became the last remaining undefeated team in the Majors. Everyone thought their pitching was going to be terrible. And it hasn’t been good (ask your Orioles fan friends their thoughts on Ubaldo Jimenez). But they lead the Majors in home runs (as does Mark Trumbo), they also have Manny Machado and while their division lead might not be sustainable, it’s not like the rest of the division hasn’t been extremely flawed thus far either.

 

The biggest story in the division is probably the fact that the 40-year-old, David Ortiz – in his final season –  is the best hitter on a Red Sox offense that leads the Majors in Runs, Hits, Total Bases, RBI, Batting Average, On-Base Percentage, Slugging and Baby Powder Walk-Off Parties. The only problem is that, despite some pretty good individual performances from Steven Wright and Rick Porcello, the Red Sox are an even more extreme version of the Orioles (1st in Runs, 19th in ERA). Ask a Red Sox fan about Clay Bucholz. Or possibly, they’re just the Orioles with national media attention.

 

Update: I’ll probably have a lot to say about Drew Pomeranz next week.

 

After two last place finishes in a row, I just didn’t see how adding David Price and Craig Kimbrel (who have both disappointed) would be enough to justify their pre-season projections. And because I felt the baseball media was too giddy to anoint Jackie Bradley Jr., Xander Bogaerts and Mookie Betts as the heirs to the Big Papi iron throne, I took the Killer B trio as overblown media hype and focused my attention on Pablo Sandoval’s exploding belt. And boy was I wrong.

 

My pick to win the division was the Toronto Blue Jays, who might still be the best team in the East, overall. Josh Donaldson is quite possibly the first half MVP. I’d say they have the second-best pitching in the league, with a standout first-half performance by Aaron Sanchez. There are a lot of reasons to be optimistic north of the border, even though Toronto’s first half will probably be best remembered for the strong jaw of Jose Bautista.

 

The Yankees and Rays have mainly been discussed in trade rumors, with Aroldis Chapman and Andrew Miller being the prized possessions before the deadline. I feel like a lot more attention should be given to Masahiro Tanaka, who might have pitched better than anybody in the league in the first half, despite nobody giving a shit. And C.C. Sabathia wasn’t too shabby, either. On the other hand, the previously-lauded Rays’ staff is about as bad as it gets. And I’d look for a lot of their struggling starters to get a change of scenery after July.

 

The AL Central

 

Playoff Team: Cleveland.

 Kluber & Co have got the Tribe cruising.

 

I picked the Indians to win the Wild Card because of their staff, and yeah, it’s been the best in the American League this season. Danny Salazar is probably the first half Cy Young Award winner, Corey Kluber is right up there and Trevor Bauer could also be in the conversation. All of that pitching, along with a better-than-expected offense (without Michael Brantley), lead Believeland to a 14-game winning streak on the heels of the Cavs winning the city’s first world title in 52 years. And they’re the AL favorites going forward.

 

And yet, prior to the season, I picked the Royals. Because how could I not pick the Royals after they’d gone to the World Series the past two seasons? Sure, they had bad projections. But they always had bad projections. Then they’d just do whatever it is that they do to win. Did you watch the All-Star Game? Eric Hosmer and his faux-hawk might have been annoying as he yelled about the Royals performing on big stages before. But he’s pretty much right. The main difference is that the 2014 and 2015 Royals were relatively injury-free. That totally has not been the case this year, with Wade Davis and Lorenzo Cain currently on the 15-day DL and Mike Moustakas out for the season.

 

With apologies to my editors, other than the Indians, the entire Central has been mediocre. Except for the Twins, I guess, who are fucking terrible. Except, you know, right before the break for some reason. The Tigers are 1-11 against Cleveland. The White Sox have Chris Sale and Jose Quintana, but don’t score any runs (somebody call Drake LaRoche!). And it’s like a bizarro version of the American League East, where very few teams hit and nobody has a positive run differential, except for the Indians.

 

The AL West

 

Playoff Team: Texas.

 We are all hoping that the Rangers and Blue Jays meet up in the playoffs.

 

The Rangers were my pick in the AL West, solely because they won the division last year and they’d be getting a full season from Cole Hamels and the return of Yu Darvish. And when they were good, they were very good. But the Rangers limped into the All-Star break with Darvish and Derek Holland on the 15-day DL and Colby Lewis on the 60. But that’s not what we want to talk about, is it? We don’t even want to talk about the hot start of Nomar Mazara or the first half of Ian Desmond. We want to talk Roogie.

 

I’d say the most memorable moment of the first half of baseball this season was the Rougned Odor overhand right to the bat-flipping face of Jose Bautista. And, holy shit, do I want a Rangers-Jays rematch in the post-season. And you should too. So we should all pray to the baseball gods (Bill James and Peter Gammons?) that the Blue Jays stay hot and the Rangers can pick up an arm or two before the deadline.

 

Another reason the Rangers need help is because the Astros are creeping. And they were my pick for a Wild Card before the season. But I also took Carlos Correa as my AL MVP, so shows what I know (I meant to say Jose Altuve, I swear). After an awful start, the Astros turned things around. And they actually have better World Series odds than the Rangers currently.

 

Okay. Here are my Top 5’s of the AL first half.

 

Top 5 AL Position Players.

1. Josh Donaldson, Toronto Blue Jays.          5.4 WAR    .424 wOBA
2. Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels.                5.5 WAR    .415 wOBA
3. Jose Altuve, Houston Astros.                     4.3 WAR    .400 wOBA
4. Manny Machado, Baltimore Orioles.          4.3 WAR    .392 wOBA
5. David Ortiz, Boston Red Sox.                     3.3 WAR    .451 wOBA

 

Honorable Mention: Ian Desmond, Robinson Cano, Jackie Bradley Jr., Xander Bogaerts, Mookie Betts, Kyle Seager.

 

Top 5 AL Pitchers.

1. Masahiro Tanaka, New York Yankees.       3.0 WAR    3.31 FIP    3.23 ERA
2. Danny Salazar, Cleveland Indians.             2.4 WAR    3.39 FIP    2.75 ERA
3. Jose Quintana, Chicago White Sox.          2.9 WAR    3.48 FIP    3.21 ERA
4. Aaron Sanchez, Toronto Blue Jays.           2.5 WAR    3.52 FIP    2.97 ERA
5. Corey Kluber, Cleveland Indians.               3.3 WAR    2.95 FIP    3.61 ERA

 

Honorable Mention: Steven Wright, Chris Sale, Trevor Bauer, Jordan Zimmermann, C.C. Sabathia, J.A. Happ, Rick Porcello.

 

Now for the National League.

 

The NL East

 

Playoff Teams: Washington, New York, Miami.

 Syndergaard has me eating crow.

 

If you’ve read this column for a while, you may remember something I wrote back in March saying to call me when the Mets’ front four approaches a 19-20 combined WAR. Even earlier than that, I said that the Nationals’ front four might be even better than the Mets’. Well, here’s how it looked at the All-Star break.

 

Mets (Syndergaard, deGrom, Matz, Harvey)             10.0 WAR

Nationals (Strasburg, Scherzer, Roark, Ross)             9.6 WAR

 

So, I’m an idiot sometimes. Noah Syndergaard has been amazing, bone spur or not. And Jacob deGrom is quietly having a good year. So if not for a few health scares with Jason Matz and, I don’t know, the fact that they’re losing Matt Harvey for the rest of the season, this staff really could have approached 90’s Braves-level awesomeness. And that’s all without mentioning America’s sweetheart, Bartolo Colon.

 

I picked the Nationals because everyone was so jacked up about them last year and I figured that there was no way their luck would be as bad as it was in 2015. What I couldn’t have predicted was just how good Daniel Murphy was going to be. I really thought October was a fluke. The 14 home runs he hit last season were a career-high. And yes, I still hate him.

 

Despite an underwhelming first half from Bryce Harper (although he started on a goddamn tear), Wilson Ramos has also picked up some offensive slack. Stephen Strasburg (with his new contract) is the only qualified starter in the Majors without a loss. As well as the first NL starter since Rube Marquard in 1912 to win his first 12 decisions of the year. Max Scherzer struck out 20 Tigers in a game, throwing 80% strikes and making Brad Ausmus a 20K victim for the third time. And all that adds up for the most franchise wins at the break, along with the infamous ’94 Expos.

 

The Mets have been plagued by so many injuries, that the only way to make this fun is to remind you of the things Bartolo Colon has already done this season. That Mays-esque catch off the mound. That home run in San Diego. The reaction of the Mets’ dugout. That time he promised the catcher he wouldn’t swing. Any of the times he runs the bases. And I repeat; that home run he hit in San Diego. It’s almost hard to believe Big Sexy exists sometimes.

 

All that being said, the door is probably wide open for the Miami Marlins to make a run in the second half. They’re getting Dee Gordon back soon. They have Jose Fernandez. And if the Home Run Derby is any indication, Giancarlo Stanton could round out an outfield so good, that Ichiro might have to wait a while before getting 10 more hits.

 

The NL Central

 

Playoff Team: Chicago.

 Looks for the Cubs to get it back together in the second half.

 

From the start, the Cubs were my pick to win it all. And they started so hot and so fun (wacky suits, mariachi bands) that a semi-epic collapse at the end of the first half still had them up 7 on the Cardinals in the division. Of course, there was the season-ending injury of Kyle Schwarber. And the past month of awful pitching. But overall, it’s been amazing. Dexter Fowler was Mr. April. Ben Zobrist was Mr. May. Jon Lester was Mr. June. Somewhere in there, Jake Arrieta threw another no-hitter. And Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo could arguably 1-2 in first-half MVP voting. Not that that’s a thing.

 

There was also the Javier Baez walk-off on Mother’s Day. The Travis Wood Game. The first Wilson Contreras at-bat. The game where Bryant had three bombs and two doubles. I just hope that the All-Star break was a reset button for a team that played 24 games in 24 days, that Arrieta can resemble his second-half performance from last year, that they get the help they need in the bullpen and all of their troubles are behind them. Then I can finally get to see the ending to what Sports Illustrated dubbed ‘the last great American sports story’. Ohpleaseohpleaseohplease.

 

You know, either that, or they could keep tanking and watch the Cardinals and Pirates pass them.

 

The NL West

 

Playoff Teams: San Francisco, Los Angeles.

 MadBum: Killin’ it.

 

All of the ‘Even Year’ dipshits can rejoice. The Giants are the best team in baseball at the half. Not that they were in 2010, 2012 or 2014. Uh oh, you fucking idiots. But Jeff Samardzija and especially Johnny Cueto were great pick-ups for San Francisco. Their front four has a 9.5 WAR, if you’re keeping score at home. And as good as the 20 K game by Scherzer and no-no from Arrieta were, the single best pitching performance in the first half was Madison Bumgarner’s from last week where he allowed 1 hit, 1 walk and struck out 14 in a complete-game shutout (98 Game Score). That would make me the only person on the planet actually talking about MadBum’s pitching.

 

In Vin Scully’s final season with the Dodgers, he might be witnessing the greatest pitcher in team history. Or maybe all-time. Or he could be hurt for a while. I don’t know. But Clayton Kershaw’s first half was so good, that I’d be willing to say he was the National League MVP, Cy Young and then Corey Seager could also let him hold his Rookie of the Year trophy while we’re at it (oh man, remember Trevor Story?). Anyway, the Dodgers’ staff was plagued by injuries. And I still can’t stand their fans. But I’d really love to see Kershaw come back soon and overtake San Fran in the Wins column.

 

Also, I was right about the Diamondbacks.

 

Now for the NL’s Top 5’s.

 

Top 5 NL Position Players.

1. Kris Bryant, Chicago Cubs.                        5.0 WAR    .403 wOBA
2. Anthony Rizzo, Chicago Cubs.                   3.5 WAR    .419 wOBA
3. Daniel Murphy, Washington Nationals.       3.7 WAR    .410 wOBA
4. Matt Carpenter, St. Louis Cardinals.           3.1 WAR    .414 wOBA
5. Jake Lamb, Arizona Diamondbacks.          3.1 WAR    .407 wOBA

 

Honorable Mention: Nolan Arenado, Brandon Belt, Corey Seager, Marcell Ozuna, Paul Goldschmidt, Carlos Gonzalez, Dexter Fowler, Wilson Ramos, Freddie Freeman, Christian Yelich.

 

Top 5 NL Pitchers.

1. Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers.          5.5 WAR    1.70 FIP    1.79 ERA
2. Noah Syndergaard, New York Mets.                 4.0 WAR    2.06 FIP    2.56 ERA
3. Jose Fernandez, Miami Marlins                        3.9 WAR    2.13 FIP    2.52 ERA
4. Johnny Cueto, San Francisco Giants.              3.7 WAR    2.70 FIP    2.47 ERA
5. Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco Giants.    3.3 WAR    2.96 FIP    1.94 ERA

 

Honorable Mention: Stephen Strasburg, Drew Pomeranz, Jake Arrieta, Jacob deGrom, Tanner Roark, Kenta Maeda, Kyle Hendricks, Max Scherzer, Jaime Martinez, Steven Matz.

 

 

Alright. That’ll do it. See you in the outfield for the second half. Check me out on Comedians Talking Baseball with Joe Kilgallon, available on iTunes. Until then, Ichiro needs 10 hits and the Cubs’ magic number is 68.

 

 


Angelino in the Outfield (Episode IV: Whose Number Should Every NL Team Retire Next?)

Written by :
Published on : March 22, 2016

 

During the upcoming 2016 season, Ken Griffey Jr., Pete Rose, Mike Piazza and Wade Boggs will have their numbers retired by the Mariners, Reds, Mets and Red Sox, respectively. And that got me thinking about which players should be next in line for those honors. So sit back, relax and enjoy while I go through all 30 teams and tell you who’s the most deserving. First, let’s do the National League.

 

Braves

 Time to retire #25

 

Retired Numbers: Warren Spahn, Eddie Mathews, Hank Aaron, Phil Niekro, Dale Murphy, Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, Bobby Cox, John Smoltz, Chipper Jones.
The easy answer would be Andruw Jones. But once upon a time the Atlanta Braves used to be known as the Boston Beaneaters and their star pitcher was Kid Nichols, who was the youngest pitcher ever to win 300 games. Granted, I’m sure there’s not a lot of love out there for a guy who retired 110 years ago. But Warren Spahn never pitched in Atlanta either. And Eddie Mathews only played one season there. I could go on, but I feel you judging me. Fine. Have it your way. It’s Andruw Jones.

 

Brewers

Guess it’s gota be him

 

Retired Numbers: Hank Aaron, Rollie Fingers, Robin Yount, Paul Molitor, Bud Selig.
You leave me no choice, Brewers. It’s Ryan Braun. I don’t want it to be, but I can’t say it’s Ben Sheets or Cecil Cooper or Teddy Higuera. So either I close my eyes and pretend I don’t know about the PED issues or how the guy seems like a grade A asshole… or I can just wait until somebody like Orlando Arcia gets called up and becomes the shit. So I guess we wait.

 

Cardinals

 He is a machine.

 

Retired Numbers: Stan Musial, Dizzy Dean, Bob Gibson, Lou Brock, August Busch Jr., Ken Boyer, Red Schoendienst, Enos Slaughter, Ozzie Smith, Bruce Sutter, Whitey Herzog, Tony La Russa, Rogers Hornsby.
It’s Albert Pujols. Did you think it wouldn’t be Albert Pujols? It seems like the Cardinals retire everybody’s number, so I’m kinda surprised they’ve never done Ted Simmons or Jim Edmonds or Ray Lankford or Ducky fucking Medwick. And maybe they’re coming. But Pujols was a monster in St. Louis and they gotta hang up #5. Until then, the other obvious answer is Cool Papa Bell of the St. Louis Stars. Everyone who has a statue outside Busch Stadium also has their number retired inside the stadium except George Sisler (who played for the St. Louis Browns, who are now the Baltimore Orioles) and Cool Papa. Let him in, guys.

 

Cubs

 Make it Dawson

 

Retired Numbers: Ernie Banks, Billy Williams, Ron Santo, Ryne Sandberg, Greg Maddux, Fergie Jenkins.
Cap Anson was a racist piece of garbage and basically the entire reason for baseball’s color line that lasted until Jackie Robinson. So it can’t be him. Ever. And I’m not sure Cubs fans would take kindly to “Sammy Sosa Appreciation Day” yet either. And the Cubs have no real sense of history from 1909 until 1969. So you’d get a lot of confused shrugs for Stan Hack or Gabby Hartnett. And anything involving ‘Tinker to Evers to Chance’ or Three Finger Brown reminds everyone of the Year That Shall Not Be Named. So your best bet here is honestly Andre Dawson or Mark Grace. The Nationals un-retired Dawson’s Expos number when the franchise moved to Washington. And I’m sure the Cubs would love to retire anything ’08 related, if you know what I mean. For Grace, just Google ‘Mark Grace slumpbuster’ to know why he’s a legendary figure on the broey North Side of Chicago. By the way, what if the only way the Curse of the Billy Goat can be broken is if Mark Grace finds Steve Bartman and/or some relative of Billy Sianis and has to sex with the fattest woman they know? Just putting that out there as the potential plot of Field of Dreams 2.

 

Diamondbacks

 Why do you hate Curt Schilling?

 

Retired Numbers: Luis Gonzalez, Randy Johnson.
So everybody must really hate Curt Schilling, huh? They could try to say that Gonzalez is their best position player in their short history and the Big Unit is their best pitcher. But c’mon. 2001. So unless you can sell me on Brandon Webb or waiting for Paul Goldschmidt, I just assume everyone there hates Schilling. Dude was co-MVP of the 2001 World Series. Why do you hate Curt Schilling???

 

Dodgers

How is #34 not retired yet?

 

Retired Numbers: Sandy Koufax, Roy Campanella, Jackie Robinson, Walter Alston, Jim Gilliam, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Don Drysdale, Tommy Lasorda, Don Sutton.
The Dodgers have never officially retired Fernando Valenzuela’s number, although his #34 has been out of circulation since his retirement. I think it’s about time. I mean, have you ever been to Dodger Stadium? I’d say about 1/3 of the people there are rocking El Toro’s jersey. And way more people would care about that than if it were say, Zack Wheat or Dazzy Vance, even though they were better players. Oh, and also there’s the whole history of Chavez Ravine and the Dodgers fucking owing him. And I don’t even need to talk about Clayton Kershaw or the rest of the 1988 team. You give that to Fernando.

 

Giants

 Will they ever forgive Barry?

 

Retired Numbers: Carl Hubbell, Mel Ott, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Juan Marichal, Bill Terry, Orlando Cepeda, Gaylord Perry, Monte Irvin, Christy Mathewson, John McGraw.
Call me crazy, but I have this weird suspicion that it’s not going to be Barry Bonds any time soon. Even though he’s the best player in Major League history to not have his number retired by anybody. And I also don’t think there’d be much support for old timers like Roger Connor or George Davis. Or Travis Jackson and Ross Youngs, even though they’re both in the Hall of Fame and played their entire career with the Giants. So either the collective members of the even-year’d Giants teams of this decade retire (and that means Buster Posey, Pablo Sandoval, Matt Cain, Tim Lincecum and Madison Bumgarner) or we forgive and embrace Barry. You know, whichever comes first.

 

Marlins

 Maybe Stanton, I guess?

 

Retired Numbers: Nobody.
Wow. I guess I agree with the Marlins, since the best player in their franchise history is probably Hanley Ramirez. And Andre Dawson and Mike Piazza are the only Hall of Famers to ever play there. You know, famous Marlin, Mike Piazza. So unless they go with Livan Hernandez from the 1997 team or Josh Beckett from the 2003 team, I guess they could honor Ichiro, should he get his 3000th hit with Miami. Or they could just wait for Giancarlo Stanton to keep being awesome when he’s not hurt. But this is a weird situation for them. This team has two World Series trophies and absolutely zero history.

 

Mets

 Do it for the Straw!

 

Retired Numbers: Casey Stengel, Gil Hodges, Tom Seaver, Mike Piazza.
Unofficially, the Mets have also retired the numbers of Gary Carter and Willie Mays. And I’m assuming they’ll eventually make those official. And they’ll probably eventually honor David Wright at some point as well. But you have no idea how bad I wish they’d do something for Dwight Gooden and Darryl Strawberry. I know, I know. But it’s not even that big of a stretch. Who’s better than those two guys in the history of the Mets that I haven’t already named? Jose Reyes? Please. The ’86 Mets have a special evil place in my heart and in their noses. I think they deserve to be honored.

 

Nationals

 But when will Bryce’s hair get its number retired?

 

Retired Numbers: Nobody.
When the Expos moved to D.C. in 2005, they un-retired the numbers for Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Tim Raines and Rusty Staub. So we know we can’t hold out for them or for guys like Steve Rogers, Tim Wallach or Vladimir Guerrero to get honored. But starting in 2005 also means the best player in their franchise history is Ryan Zimmerman. I mean, it will be Bryce Harper. But the Nationals need to take their own lead from outside their stadium (where they have statues of former Senators greats, Walter Johnson and Frank Howard, as well as Homestead Grays great, Josh Gibson) and hook it up inside. Start there. We can talk about Sam Rice and Goose Goslin and Buck Leonard later.

 

Padres

 It’s got to be Peavy

 

Retired Numbers: Steve Garvey, Randy Jones, Dave Winfield, Tony Gwynn, Trevor Hoffman.
How happy am I that the Padres are using brown uniforms this year? Anyway, this is hard. Kevin Brown was silly in ’98, the last year they went to the World Series. But that was his only year on the team. So it has to be Jake Peavy. I mean, I don’t want it to be Jake Peavy. But I won’t condone any celebration of Andy Benes.

 

Phillies

 It should be Chase Utley

 

Retired Numbers: Robin Roberts, Richie Ashburn, Steve Carlton, Mike Schmidt, Jim Bunning, Pete Alexander, Chuck Klein.
They can’t slap an old timers thing next to Pete Alexander and Chuck Klein for Ed Delahanty or Sherry Magee? Fine. Then they’re going to have to do something for Chase Utley and Jimmy Rollins. If not also Ryan Howard and Chalie Manuel. See, children. There was a time not so long ago when the Philadelphia Phillies didn’t absolutely suck.

 

Pirates

 Give Arky his due!

 

Retired Numbers: Honus Wagner, Billy Meyer, Pie Traynor, Roberto Clemente, Danny Murtaugh, Willie Stargell, Bill Mazeroski, Ralph Kiner, Paul Waner.
Is there any good reason why the Pirates never retired Arky Vaughan’s number? Or Bob Friend’s? Or Max Carey’s? Or Babe Adams’? Or Fred Clarke’s? You know, other than Carey and Adams hating Clarke, and Clarke being bona fide clubhouse poison during the 1926 season. I looked that up. Anyway, the Pirates need to do a better job with honoring their long history. Because the next best pick is Skinny Barry Bonds until Andrew McCutchen stacks more on to his career numbers. Is the world ready to honor Skinny Barry Bonds?

 

Reds

 Bid McPhee!

 

Retired Numbers: Fred Hutchinson, Johnny Bench, Frank Robinson, Joe Morgan, Ted Kluszewski, Tony Perez, Sparky Anderson, Dave Concepcion, Barry Larkin, Pete Rose.
Bid McPhee! Come on! The guy is in the Hall of Fame after playing his entire career with the Cincinnati Reds. They even ripped off his handle bar mustache for their stupid logo. But somehow, they can’t honor the guy by name inside the ballpark. YOUR LOGO IS A BASEBALL DISGUISED AS BID McPHEE, CINCINNATI! Anyway, after Pete Rose, the only position players for the ’75-76 Big Red Machine to not have their numbers retired are the outfielders – George Foster, Cesar Geronimo and Ken Griffey Sr. And Foster is just as good a choice as anyone else. Except Big McPhee. They’re seriously killing me the with no Bid McPhee.

 

Rockies

What exactly are they waiting for?

 

Retired Numbers: Todd Helton.
I don’t know what they’re waiting for with Larry Walker. And it’s not like Troy Tulowitzki is coming back any time soon. So unless they’re also hung up on Walker’s home/road splits, they should pull the trigger or just give it to Ubaldo Jimenez for actually having one decent season pitching in the thin air of Denver in 2010.

 

 

That’s it for the NL, stay tuned for the American League!

 

 


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