Get to know: the Big 3 basketball league

Written by :
Published on : August 18, 2017

 

No, it’s not the NBA but it’s hoops and it’s totally fun. It’s a 3-on-3 basketball league featuring some of the game’s favorites. The Big 3 is the brain child of Ice Cube and entertainment executive, Jeff Kwatinetz. They managed to create something that is new and familiar all at the same time. So lace up your Jordans and let’s get inside the Big 3 basketball league.

 

The Big 3 plays by it’s own rules. Beyond being only 3-on-3, the game is half court ball and has many unique differences as compared to traditional basketball. The most flashy of the changes are the 4 point shots. There are three 4 point hot spots on the court all 30 feet away from the basket. Almost feels a little Rock-n-Jock. Also, the shot clock is 14 seconds but there is no game clock. Half time comes when one team gets to 25 points. Get to 50 and you win. Must win by 2 though. Other rules of note, all fouls are assessed to the team, no personal fouls, so no player can foul out. And no jump balls, home team starts with the rock.

 

In terms of game play, teams must take the ball beyond the arc after a rebound. But in the instance of a steal or an air ball, the team can go straight to the hoop. All of these rules are in place to create isolation basketball. A chance to get to see an elite talent, in space, creating offense. That’s the best part. That’s what the NBA lives on. The Big 3 found a way to boil the sport down to just those entertaining moments. While also making the game it accessible to some older stars who still have plenty to give.

 

Embed from Getty Images

 

The Big 3 started with 8 teams (7 players on each roster) in the league and each crew features a big name coach. Names likes Allen Iverson, Gary Payton, Rick Barry, George Gervin, Clyde Drexler, Rick Mahorn and Julius Irving. That’s some legit basketball intelligence leading the way.

 

The teams are:

Ball Hogs – Brian Scalabrine, Josh Childress and Bobby Simmons.

3 Headed Monsters – Rashard Lewis, Jason Williams and Kwame Brown.

Ghost Ballers – Mike Bibby, Ricky Davis and Larry Hughes.

Power – Corey Maggette, Cuttino Mobley and Jerome Williams.

3’s Company – Allen Iverson (player/coach), DerMarr Johnson and Al Thornton.

Trilogy – Kenyon Martin, Al Harrington and Jannero Pargo.

Killer 3s – Charles Oakley (player/coach), Chauncy Billips and Stephen Jackson.

Tri-State – Jermaine O’Neal, Bonzi Wells and Mike James.

 

Embed from Getty Images

 

The last name to know is actor and basketball fan, Michael Rapaport, who acts as the on-court reporter and is normally very funny. The Big 3 is basically a love letter to the NBA, street ball and all of basketball culture. If you are totally new to this sport then you are in luck because the Big 3 playoffs are about to kickoff and if you call yourself a hoops fan, then you should check it out.

 

Messed around and got a triple double.

 

 


SBS Film Vault: Like Mike

Written by :
Published on : April 19, 2017

 

 

2002’s Like Mike is another orphan sports story just like Angels in the Outfield. But our hero isn’t watching from the sidelines, he ends up balling with real NBA pros. It’s really like Angels in the Outfield mixed with something like Rookie of the Year. But with basketball. Time to lace up your favorite sneakers and hit the hardwood for this latest update of the SBS Film Vault.

 

The story

13-year-old Calvin Cambridge (Bow Wow) lives in an orphanage where basketball is his biggest passion. He sells candy bars outside LA’s Staples Center for the orphanage’s crooked proprietor. Calvin remains upbeat and knows he is destined for something big. One day, Calvin finds an old pair of sneakers with the initials “MJ” on the faded tongue. Could they really be Michael Jordan’s old kicks? Well before we can find out, local youth home bully, Ox, tosses the sneakers onto a power line. Cut to later, Calvin and his buds go out in a rain storm with the hopes of getting the shoes down. Lighting, the power line, it’s all very Back to the Future. Calvin survives the lighting strike and now the Nikes seems magically charged.

 

like mike shoe

 

Later, the orphan kids win tickets to the game and then Calvin wins a chance to play 1-on-1 with LA Knights star (yeah, they have a fake team even though the rest of the league is real NBA) Tracy Reynolds (Chestnut) at halftime. Calvin laces up his shoes and wishes to be “like Mike” and after that, he is. He can dribble, shoot and dunk just like his Airness himself. That’s right, 4’8″ Calvin Cambridge can easily dunk the ball. Yeah it shocks everyone. Calvin gets signed to the LA Knights and this flick is off and rolling. The only catch being, he needs to be wearing the shoes for the magic to work.

 

The cast

Starring Lil Bow Wow or Bow Wow or Shad Moss, depending on how well you know him. The funny little kid from Jerry Maguire (Jonathan Lipnicki) and a whole host of real NBA stars. Including: Allen Iverson, Steve Nash, Jason Kidd, Vince Carter, Tracy McGrady, Dirk Nowitzki, Gary Payton, David Robinson, Rasheed Wallace and Chris Webber just to name a few. Also real actors like Morris Chestnut, Crispin Glover, Eugene Levy, Brenda Song, Jesse Plemons, Fred Armisen, Reginald VelJohnson and Robert Forster.

 

like mike poster

 

Takeaways

No it’s not the Lakers or Clippers, the made up Los Angeles team is the Knights which is great. Only thing better would have been the Hollywood Knights. Bob Seger rules! Tracy, the Knights other star, adopts the fucking kids at the end! Just like Angels in the Outfield. Both Calvin and his buddy Murph move in with Tracy. Who is another single man who spends all his time traveling for work and he just brings home two human beings like it’s picking up a pizza. Michael Jordan never shows up. You’d expect at least a small cameo, but nothing. I’m sure there was a very important card game he was attending.

 

This flick is really just a 99 minute commercial for Nike. I wouldn’t be surprised if the real Michael Jordan was a secret producer on this project. It’s all one big conspiracy to sell more sneakers and apparel. Seems like a bet MJ would take. I mean he is thanked in the credits. Just saying.

 

It must be the shoes.

 

 


Kings of the game: 21

Written by :
Published on : May 29, 2016

 

 

Chances are, if you grew up playing basketball in some capacity, you’re familiar with the rules of the game 21. My first time playing, I was not. Mainly because I didn’t understand the concept of tipping the ball back in—any buckets I drained were usually zeroed out within moments. Nobody told me what to do. Nobody spared me the embarrassment. Part of the beauty of the game is that it’s you against the world, a showcase for the arsenal of shots, fakes, and (in my case) fancy turnovers at your disposal.

 

Given that the game is so different from traditional 5-on-5 basketball, an important question arises: who is the greatest 21 player of all time? Is it just MJ, hands down the GOAT? What about the other Goat, street hoops legend Earl Manigault, famed for snatching quarters from the tops of backboards? Perhaps the greatest 21 player of all time isn’t even a basketball player; maybe, for some reason, it’s Charlie Adam, currently a reserve player for Stoke City FC in the Barclays Premier League.

 

 

The ScoreBoredSports hoops-loving staff asks this question in the heat of the playoffs, while our minds are most finely attuned to the rhythms of Dr. Naismith’s beautiful game.

 

Antoine Poutine’s pick: Allen Iverson

My candidate is the absolute embodiment of three of what I believe are the game of 21’s most crucial aspects.

 

 

Shot Making: If you can’t put the ball in the basket, there’s little hope of staying competitive for very long. Knockout versions of the game might even get you bounced altogether. So a great 21 player needs to be able to get past his man and create a shot, but also make the damn thing. AI, the Answer, is pound-for-pound the greatest shot-maker in the history of basketball.

 

Stealing the ball: If you don’t have the ball in 21, you can’t win the game. Getting it back is priority number one if you’ve lost it. There also aren’t any team-defense concepts out there, no wrinkles, no zone. Just rip the damn ball from your man. AI is the NBA single-game playoff record holder for steals with 10 (!) against the Orlando Magic in 1999. He’s 12th all-time in career steals in the NBA.

 

Me against the World: Nobody better embodies what’s at the core of 21, which is to prove yourself on your own merits. No practice, no team, no teammates. Just your game. Allen Iverson is the purest gamer in basketball’s history, for better and worse. It doesn’t make him the all-time greatest player, but perhaps the one best suited for the brutal gauntlet that is 21.

 

Bruno Tysh’s pick: Kevin Durant

He can literally do it all. He has the size and skill perfect for the iso play of 21.

 

KD flex

 

OffenseKD excels at creating his own shot. He can use his dribble to either get off a clean jumper or just straight power to the basket. I don’t see many defenders with the size and speed to guard him effectively.

 

Defense: The length is the key here. That wingspan allows him to stay a step back while still being all over you. Durant also has the foot speed to recover and make a play at the rim. Dude will swat some shots.

 

Tip ins: This ends the conversation. If any opponent misses then Durant will be right there for the tip in. Guy is tall and can jump out the gym, so good luck. Only way to beat KD could be to never miss. Ever.

 

Alex Jag’s pick: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Before LeBron, before Jordan, before Magic, there was Kareem (and before ’71 there was Lew, but it’s kind of confusing).

 

 

Offense: Two words: Sky hook. If you watch the above video you can see that that shit is damn near unstoppable. How in the hell do you defend something like that? Kareem was a beast with the ball in his hand. He could drive the ball down the court and once he did he would use his 7’2″ frame to create space and just go up over the top of you and drop the ball in the net. With either hand! Try to tell me anyone else on this list could defend that.

 

Defense: The key here is Kareem’s shot blocking ability. Any one of these other guys who try to put the ball up are going to be in for a rude awakening. Kareem had the height and the jumping ability to send that basketball right back in their face. He was the NBA blocks leader four times and was selected to eleven All-NBA defensive teams.

 

Tip ins: This one relates to his defensive abilities. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was a tall, big body that barely had to try to get himself up to the rim. This game would just be too easy for him. Plus, he was great in Airplane!

 

Phred Brown’s Pick: Reggie Miller

These are the things you need to win a game of 21: great shooting, even better free throw shooting, a little bit of height and a sharp tongue. For these reasons, I believe Reggie Miller would be the greatest threat in a game of 21.

 

 

Offense: By the time someone steps out to play D, he’s already hit a three. With his great free throw shooting, be prepared watch him run the table. The post-up, mid range game is not much of a factor in 21. If you are winning 21, you’re either a big man living off the tip-in or a good outside shooter. Reggie Miller being one of the best in the latter category.

 

Defense: Miller is long enough to grab an errant rebound and all he needs is one. And seeing as there are many guys behind you waiting to play defense, incredible stopping ability isn’t needed. Reggie is better off hanging outside the lane and looking for steals or rebounds.

 

X factor: He can talk some good trash all while hitting shots.

 

 

Did we leave out your favorite baller? And don’t say Air Bud. Drop your non-canine thoughts in the comments below.

 

Game.

 

 


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